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Novel PCSK9 Inhibitor Cut LDL Cholesterol Levels by More Than Half

DAIC

milla1cf Sun, 04/07/2024 - 18:09 April 7, 2024 — Among patients at high or very high risk for a heart attack or stroke, the addition of the investigational drug lerodalcibep to standard cholesterol-lowering medication for one year reduced LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, levels by more than half on average, compared with a placebo.

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Gut bacteria can break down cholesterol

Nature Reviews - Cardiology

Nature Reviews Cardiology, Published online: 16 April 2024; doi:10.1038/s41569-024-01026-w A new study identifies a group of gut bacteria that can metabolize cholesterol and are associated with lower plasma cholesterol levels.

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More than half of American Indian youth may have abnormal or high cholesterol

Science Daily - Heart Disease

More than 70% of American Indian young adults aged 20-39 and 50% of American Indian teens have cholesterol levels or elevated fat in the blood that put them at risk for cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests.

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New Mexico researchers develop cholesterol vaccine

Becker's Hospital Review - Cardiology

Researchers at UNM School of Medicine have developed a new LDL cholesterol vaccine that is tested on mice and monkeys with positive results.

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Vitamin once recommended for lowering cholesterol linked to CV disease

Becker's Hospital Review - Cardiology

Niacin , a common B vitamin once recommended to patients as a way to help lower cholesterol, has been linked to cardiovascular disease, Cleveland Clinic researchers announced Feb.

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The future of heart health: Researchers develop vaccine to lower cholesterol

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

adults have high cholesterol, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Untreated, high cholesterol can lead to heart disease and stroke, which are two of the top causes of death in the U.S. Nearly two in five U.S.

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The liver immune system eats up 'bad cholesterol'

Science Daily - Heart Disease

A new study reveals that immune cells in the liver react to high cholesterol levels and eat up excess cholesterol that can otherwise cause damage to arteries. The findings suggest that the response to the onset of atherosclerosis begins in the liver.