2024

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COVID May Affect Type 1 Diabetes in Kids, and Not in a Good Way

Med Page Today

(MedPage Today) -- COVID-19 may accelerate progression of presymptomatic type 1 diabetes in youth, a German study suggested. Incidence of clinical type 1 diabetes nearly doubled after the pandemic started among 591 youth ages 1 to 16 known to.

COVID-19 141
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Nonpharmacological interventions on glycated haemoglobin in youth with type 1 diabetes: a Bayesian network meta-analysis

Cardiovascular Diabetology

The available evidence on the impact of specific non-pharmacological interventions on glycaemic control is currently limited. Consequently, there is a need to determine which interventions could provide the mo.

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Global epidemiology of heart failure

Nature Reviews - Cardiology

Nature Reviews Cardiology, Published online: 26 June 2024; doi:10.1038/s41569-024-01046-6 In this Review, Khan and colleagues explore the evolving global epidemiology of heart failure (HF), focusing on changes in incidence and prevalence across the spectrum of left ventricular ejection fraction. The authors highlight the disparities in our understanding of HF epidemiology in low-income and middle-income countries, affirming the need for improved surveillance and resource allocation in vulnerable

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Live Updates from the FDA Psychopharmacologic Advisory Committee Meeting on MDMA for PTSD

HCPLive

Follow HCPLive's coverage of the full-day FDA committee meeting regarding Lykos Therapeutics' application for MDMA-assisted therapy as a novel treatment for patients with PTSD.

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White adipocytes in subcutaneous fat depots require KLF15 for maintenance in preclinical models

Journal of Clinical Investigation - Cardiology

Healthy adipose tissue is essential for normal physiology. There are 2 broad types of adipose tissue depots: brown adipose tissue (BAT), which contains adipocytes poised to burn energy through thermogenesis, and white adipose tissue (WAT), which contains adipocytes that store lipids. However, within those types of adipose, adipocytes possess depot and cell-specific properties that have important implications.

Obesity 137
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Population shifts, risk factors may triple U.S. cardiovascular disease costs by 2050

American Heart News - Heart News

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT/5 a.m. ET Tuesday, June 4, 2024 DALLAS, June 4, 2024 — Driven by an older, more diverse population, along with a significant increase in risk factors including high blood pressure and obesity, total costs related to.

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Study discovers connection between between heart and brain in KBG syndrome

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

A new study sheds light on a medical question scientists have long wondered: why do 40% of children with the rare neurodevelopmental disorder KBG syndrome have heart defects? The research now points to a critical link between the heart and the brain. The research is published in the journal Nature Communications.

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Contemporary approach to cardiogenic shock care: a state-of-the-art review

Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine

Cardiogenic shock (CS) is a time-sensitive and hemodynamically complex syndrome with a broad spectrum of etiologies and clinical presentations. Despite contemporary therapies, CS continues to maintain high morbidity and mortality ranging from 35 to 50%. More recently, burgeoning observational research in this field aimed at enhancing the early recognition and characterization of the shock state through standardized team-based protocols, comprehensive hemodynamic profiling, and tailored and selec

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8-hour time-restricted eating linked to a 91% higher risk of cardiovascular death

Science Daily - Heart Disease

A study of over 20,000 adults found that those who followed an 8-hour time-restricted eating schedule, a type of intermittent fasting, had a 91% higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

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New heart disease risk tool finds 40% fewer people need statins: Study

Becker's Hospital Review - Cardiology

New study suggests that 40% fewer people may need statins for heart disease prevention, according to a risk assessment published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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More Evidence That Flu Is Linked to Heart Attacks

Med Page Today

(MedPage Today) -- Influenza infection was associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI), especially for those without a prior hospitalization for coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a Dutch observational case series.

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Challenges and opportunities in the management of type 2 diabetes in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease: a tailored diagnosis and treatment review

Cardiovascular Diabetology

Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) often results from atherosclerosis, and is highly prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Individuals with T2DM exhibit a more severe manifes.

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Ultra-processed foods and cardiovascular disease

Nature Reviews - Cardiology

Nature Reviews Cardiology, Published online: 30 January 2024; doi:10.1038/s41569-024-00990-7 In this Comment, we critically examine the association between the increasing consumption of ultra-processed foods and their negative effect on cardiovascular health. We explore the historical evolution of food processing, the Nova food classification and the epidemiological evidence, and highlight the need for urgent public health interventions.

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Generic Liraglutide (Victoza) Becomes First Generic GLP-1 Receptor Agonist

HCPLive

Teva Pharmaceuticals’ launch of an authorized generic of liraglutide injection 1.8 mg (Victoza) for type 2 diabetes makes it the first-ever generic GLP-1.

Diabetes 142
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Transcutaneous Pacing: Part 2

EMS 12-Lead

TCP in the ROSC Patient: False Electrical Capture at 75mA Josh Kimbrell, NRP @joshkimbre Judah Kreinbrook, EMT-P @JMedic2JDoc This is the second installment of a blog series showing how transcutaneous pacing (TCP) can be difficult and how you can improve your skills. We will be using redacted information from different cases where paramedics attempted TCP in the field.

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8-hour time-restricted eating linked to a 91% higher risk of cardiovascular death

American Heart News - Heart News

Research Highlights: A study of over 20,000 adults found that those who followed an 8-hour time-restricted eating schedule, a type of intermittent fasting, had a 91% higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease. People with heart disease or cancer.

Cancer 145
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Google Street View reveals how built environment correlates with risk of cardiovascular disease

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

Researchers have used Google Street View to study hundreds of elements of the built environment, including buildings, green spaces, pavements and roads, and how these elements relate to each other and influence coronary artery disease in people living in these neighborhoods.

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Ep 193 The Crashing Asthmatic – Recognition and Management of Life Threatening Asthma

ECG Cases

In this part 2 of our 2-part podcast on asthma with Dr. Sameer Mal and Dr. Leeor Sommer, we dig into the recognition and management of life-threatening asthma. We answer such questions as: what are the key elements in recognition of threatening asthma? What are the most time-sensitive interventions required to break the vicious cycle of asthma? What are the best options for dosing and administering magnesium sulphate, epinephrine, fentanyl and ketamine in the management of the crashing asthmatic

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Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection: A Focus on Post-Dissection Care for the Vascular Medicine Clinician

Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon condition which is increasingly recognized as a cause of significant morbidity. SCAD can cause acute coronary syndrome and myocardial infarction (MI), as well as sudden cardiac death. It presents similarly to atherosclerotic MI although typically in patients with few or no atherosclerotic risk factors, and particularly in women.

SCAD 137
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Risk of dementia was nearly three times higher the first year after a stroke

American Heart News - Stroke News

Research Highlights: In a large population study conducted in Canada, the risk of dementia was nearly 3 times higher in the first year after a stroke, then fell to a 1.5-times increased risk by the 5-year mark and remained elevated 20 years later.

Dementia 138
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Multiomic screening of invasive GBM cells reveals targetable transsulfuration pathway alterations

Journal of Clinical Investigation - Cardiology

While the poor prognosis of glioblastoma arises from the invasion of a subset of tumor cells, little is known of the metabolic alterations within these cells that fuel invasion. We integrated spatially addressable hydrogel biomaterial platforms, patient site–directed biopsies, and multiomics analyses to define metabolic drivers of invasive glioblastoma cells.

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Is Cholesterol Denialism Pseudoscience or Appropriate Medical Care?

Med Page Today

(MedPage Today) -- Recently, a cardiologist published a commentary in Medscape arguing that physicians and scientists who challenge the putative clinical benefit of statin medications are pseudoscientists. He claimed, ".somewhere along the way.

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How will you save this critically ill patient? A fundamental and lifesaving ECG interpretation that everyone must recognize instantly.

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Pendell Meyers A woman in her 30s called EMS for acute symptoms including near-syncope, nausea, diaphoresis, and abdominal pain. EMS arrived and found her to appear altered, critically ill, and hypotensive. An ECG was performed: What do you think? Extremely wide complex monomorphic rhythm just over 100 bpm. The QRS is so wide and sinusoidal that the only real possibilities left are hyperkalemia or Na channel blockade.

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Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in post-COVID-19 syndrome: a major health-care burden

Nature Reviews - Cardiology

Nature Reviews Cardiology, Published online: 02 January 2024; doi:10.1038/s41569-023-00962-3 Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction (CVAD) is a malfunction of the autonomic control of circulatory homeostasis and is an important component of post-COVID-19 syndrome. In this Review, Fedorowski and colleagues define the major forms of CVAD (including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome), and discuss the aetiology, diagnosis and management of post-COVID-19 syndrome-associated CVAD.

COVID-19 145
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FDA Approves Risankizumab (Skyrizi) for Ulcerative Colitis

HCPLive

The approval is based on data from a pair of phase 3 studies and makes risankizumab-rzaa the first IL-23 specific inhibitor approved for both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

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Women who experience depression during pregnancy or after birth have higher risk of cardiovascular disease

Science Daily - Heart Disease

Women diagnosed with perinatal depression are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease in the following 20 years compared to women who have given birth without experiencing perinatal depression. The study is the first of its kind to look at cardiovascular health after perinatal depression and included data on around 600,000 women. It found the strongest links with risks of high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease and heart failure.

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Cannabis use linked to increase in heart attack and stroke risk

American Heart News - Heart News

Research Highlights: An analysis of survey data for 430,000 adults in the U.S. found that using cannabis has a significant association with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, independent of tobacco use, with higher odds among the adults.

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Over-the-counter supplement found to improve walking for peripheral artery disease patients

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

The over-the-counter supplement nicotinamide riboside, a form of vitamin B3, increased the walking endurance of patients with peripheral artery disease, a chronic leg condition for which there are few effective treatments.

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61% of US adults will have cardiovascular disease by 2050, American Heart Association says

Becker's Hospital Review - Cardiology

A majority of adults in the U.S. — around 61% — are likely to be diagnosed with a form of cardiovascular disease by 2050, according to new American Heart Association data. The increased burden will cost the U.S. health system $1.8 trillion in the time frame.

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Double diabetes—when type 1 diabetes meets type 2 diabetes: definition, pathogenesis and recognition

Cardiovascular Diabetology

Currently, the differentiation between type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is not straightforward, and the features of both types of diabetes coexist in one subject. This situation triggered the ne.

Diabetes 130
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Why Nighttime Light Exposure is So Harmful for Cardiovascular Health

Physiologically Speaking

Our body’s physiological processes oscillate on a 24-hour cycle known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms in blood pressure and heart rate, among other functions, are crucial for cardiovascular health and preventing cardiovascular disease. Recent evidence indicates that nighttime light exposure impacts melatonin release, the autonomic nervous system, and cortisol — with potentially harmful effects on cardiovascular health.

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CTRP4/interleukin-6 receptor signaling ameliorates autoimmune encephalomyelitis by suppressing Th17 cell differentiation

Journal of Clinical Investigation - Cardiology

C1q/TNF-related protein 4 (CTRP4) is generally thought to be released extracellularly and plays a critical role in energy metabolism and protecting against sepsis. However, its physiological functions in autoimmune diseases have not been thoroughly explored. In this study, we demonstrate that Th17 cell–associated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was greatly exacerbated in Ctrp4–/– mice compared with WT mice due to increased Th17 cell infiltration.

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Lifestyle-Dementia Links Persist Regardless of Risk Genes, French Study Shows

Med Page Today

(MedPage Today) -- Lifestyle and other dementia risk factors were linked with cognitive changes independently of genetic risks for Alzheimer's disease, a French prospective study found. Across nearly 5,200 people in three French cities, worse.

Dementia 143
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What is this ECG finding? Do you understand it before you hear the clinical context?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Pendell Meyers First try to interpret this ECG with no clinical context: The ECG shows an irregularly irregular rhythm, therefore almost certainly atrial fibrillation. After an initially narrow QRS, there is a very large abnormal extra wave at the end of the QRS complex. These are Osborn waves usually associated with hypothermia. There is also large T wave inversion and long QT.

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Atherosclerotic plaque stabilization and regression: a review of clinical evidence

Nature Reviews - Cardiology

Nature Reviews Cardiology, Published online: 04 January 2024; doi:10.1038/s41569-023-00979-8 In this Review, Sarraju and Nissen summarize the clinical trial evidence for coronary atherosclerotic plaque stabilization and regression with plasma LDL-cholesterol-lowering therapy and other treatments. Invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities used to assess plaque burden and composition are discussed.

Plaque 139
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Boehringer Ingelheim Announces $35 Monthly Price Cap on Inhalers for Asthma, COPD Patients

HCPLive

On March 07, 2024, Boehringer Ingelheim announced it would be instituting a $35 per month out-of-pocket cost cap for its portfolio of inhaler products, with this cap going into effect on June 01, 2024.

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30-year risk of cardiovascular disease may help inform blood pressure treatment decisions

Science Daily - Heart Disease

According to a new study, both 30-year risk for cardiovascular disease in addition to 10-year risk may be considered in making decisions about when to initiate high blood pressure medication.