Thu.Mar 28, 2024

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Our Brains Are Getting Bigger, MRIs Show

Med Page Today

(MedPage Today) -- Human brains appeared to be getting bigger, temporal trends showed. From the 1930s to 1970s, brain volumes and cortical surface area of people who had neither dementia nor stroke became progressively larger, reported Charles.

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Alcohol raises heart disease risk, particularly among women

Science Daily - Heart Disease

Young to middle-aged women who reported drinking eight or more alcoholic beverages per week--more than one per day, on average--were significantly more likely to develop coronary heart disease compared with those who drank less, finds a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session. The risk was highest among both men and women who reported heavy episodic drinking, or 'binge' drinking, and the link between alcohol and heart disease appears to be especially str

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Wide Complex Tachycardia -- VT, SVT, or A Fib with RVR? If SVT, is it AVNRT or AVRT?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

A 69 y.o. male with pertinent past medical history including Atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, cardiomyopathy, Pulmonary Embolism, and hypertension presented to the Emergency Department via ambulance for respiratory distress and tachycardia. Per EMS report, patient believes he has been in atrial fibrillation for 5 days, since coming down with flu-like illness with rhinorrhea, productive cough, SOB.

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Eggs may not be bad for your heart after all

Science Daily - Heart Disease

Whether you like your eggs sunny-side up, hard boiled or scrambled, many hesitate to eat them amid concerns that eggs may raise cholesterol levels and be bad for heart health. However, results from a prospective, controlled trial show that over a four-month period cholesterol levels were similar among people who ate fortified eggs most days of the week compared with those who didn't eat eggs.

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Medtronic Announces FDA Approval of Newest-generation Evolut TAVR System for Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis

DAIC

milla1cf Thu, 03/28/2024 - 07:30 March 28, 2024 — Medtronic plc, a global leader in healthcare technology, announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration ( FDA ) has approved the Evolut FX+ transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) system for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. The latest Evolut FX+ TAVR system maintains the valve performance benefits of the legacy Evolut TAVR platform and is designed to facilitate coronary access.

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For younger women, mental health now may predict heart health later

Science Daily - Heart Disease

Younger women are generally thought to have a low risk of heart disease, but new research urges clinicians to revisit that assumption, especially for women who suffer from certain mental health conditions. A new study found that having anxiety or depression could accelerate the development of cardiovascular risk factors among young and middle-aged women.

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Virtual rehabilitation provides benefits for stroke recovery

Science Daily - Stroke

A stroke often impacts a person's ability to move their lower body from the hips down to the feet. This leads to diminished quality of life and mental health in addition to increased susceptibility to falls. But now, researchers are exploring new treatment methods to help bridge the service delivery gap, and recovery outcomes, for patients after a stroke.

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Study discovers how a magnesium cellular transport 'pump' plays a vital role in cardiac function

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

Magnesium is a mineral critical to a wide range of biological functions, and a new study takes aim at how it's transported to address cardiac dysfunction and other diseases, opening new possibilities for treatment.

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How built environment correlates with risk of cardiovascular disease

Science Daily - Heart Disease

Researchers have studied hundreds of elements of the built environment, including buildings, green spaces, pavements and roads, and how these elements relate to each other and influence coronary artery disease in people living in these neighborhoods. Their findings show that these factors can predict 63% of the variation in the risk of coronary heart disease from one area to another.

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Researchers report clear shift in arterial diseases in diabetes

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

There has been a redistribution in the risk of arterial disease in type 1 and 2 diabetes. The risks of heart attack and stroke have decreased significantly, while complications in more peripheral vessels have increased in relative importance, according to studies at the University of Gothenburg.

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The Bizarre History of the Human Heart

Med Page Today

(MedPage Today) -- In this video, Mikhail Varshavski, DO -- who goes by "Dr. Mike" on social media -- gives a history lesson on the heart, including cultural depictions and the evolution of our understanding of anatomy. Following is a.

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Persistent epigenetic signals propel a senescence-associated secretory phenotype and trained innate immunity in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells from diabetic patients

Cardiovascular Diabetology

Diabetes-induced trained immunity contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. This study aimed to investigate in humans whether epigenetic signals involved in immune cell activatio.

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Diabetes Dialogue: All Things AID at ATTD 2024

HCPLive

In this episode, all things AID from the 17th annual ATTD, including updates from Insulet Corporation and Omnipod, study data from the Control IQ algorithm, the SMASH study, and a peak into the future with the Neural Network AID algorithm.

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The meds that could increase heart damage in young adults

Becker's Hospital Review - Cardiology

Young adults prescribed stimulant medications for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are 57% more likely to develop cardiomyopathy after eight years compared to those not on stimulants, a new study found.

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Short-Term Biofeedback Therapies Lead to Alleviation of Certain Long COVID Symptoms

HCPLive

The investigators seek to replicate the data in a future randomized control trial, and they hope to compare biofeedback to different therapies such as pulmonary rehabilitation.

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Secondary Mitral Regurgitation Phenotypes and M-TEER Trials: Key Points

American College of Cardiology

The following are key points to remember from a state-of-the-art review on the evolving concept of secondary mitral regurgitation (MR) phenotypes and lessons from the mitral transcatheter edge-to-edge repair (M-TEER) trials.

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Beyond Colonoscopy: Shifting Incidence, Mortality Prompts New Era of Colorectal Cancer Screening

HCPLive

The recent rise in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in younger patients has sparked a serious discussion about strategies to increase screening uptake and adherence, raising questions about the role of noninvasive tests versus the traditional “gold standard,” colonoscopy.

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Coronary inflammation based on pericoronary adipose tissue attenuation in type 2 diabetic mellitus: effect of diabetes management

Cardiovascular Diabetology

Coronary inflammation plays crucial role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) induced cardiovascular complications. Both glucose-lowering drug interventions (GLDIS) and glycemic control (GC) status potentially c.

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Qazi Corner, Edition 5: Tofacitinib, Fenofibrates, Pouchitis Guidelines and BLUE-C

HCPLive

The first quarterly issue of 2024 reviews a promising JAK inhibitor for acute severe ulcerative colitis, fenofibrates in PBC, new recommendations from the AGA, and a next generation multi-target DNA stool test for detecting colorectal cancer.

Cancer 59
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AI-Derived Risk Score for Mortality in Secondary Mitral Regurgitation

American College of Cardiology

What is the performance of an artificial intelligence (AI)-derived risk score in predicting 1-year outcomes of patients with secondary mitral regurgitation (SMR) undergoing transcatheter edge-to-edge repair (TEER)?

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Fenofibrates in the Treatment of Primary Biliary Cholangitis

HCPLive

HCPLive is a comprehensive clinical news and information portal that provides physicians with up-to-date specialty and disease-specific resources designed to help them provide better care to patients. At HCPLive, you will find breaking news, video interviews with physician experts, in-depth conference coverage, finance and practice management updates, insight and analysis from physician contributors, and more.

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Donor Heart Acceptance by Race and Gender on Transplant Waitlist

American College of Cardiology

For patients on the heart transplant waiting list, what association does race and gender have with the probability of donor heart offers being accepted?

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Pressing Challenges in Colorectal Cancer Screening

HCPLive

In part 2 of our 5-part discussion, experts discuss challenges they face getting patients to engage in screening and how to effectively discuss screening with patients.

Cancer 59
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Advancing Wearable Biosensors for Congenital Heart Disease: Patient and Clinician Perspectives: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association

Circulation

Circulation, Ahead of Print. Wearable biosensors (wearables) enable continual, noninvasive physiologic and behavioral monitoring at home for those with pediatric or congenital heart disease. Wearables allow patients to access their personal data and monitor their health. Despite substantial technologic advances in recent years, issues with hardware design, data analysis, and integration into the clinical workflow prevent wearables from reaching their potential in high-risk congenital heart disea

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Pegloticase Treatment Associated with Concomitant Bone Remodeling in Gout

HCPLive

Kenneth Saag, MD, explores the clinical significance of a study demonstrating treatment with pegloticase leads to bone remodeling in patients with gout.

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Artificial Intelligence tool successfully predicts fatal heart rhythm

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

In a Leicester study that looked at whether artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to predict whether a pe 100 29351 0 29351 0 0 258k 0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 260k rson was at risk of a lethal heart rhythm, an AI tool correctly identified the condition 80% of the time.

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Reaching Patients in Need of Screening for Colorectal Cancer

HCPLive

In part 3 of our 5-part discussion, experts discuss the importance of screening among younger patient populations and strategies to encourage screening in patient populations susceptible to nonadherence.

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Review highlights beneficial interplay between caloric restriction, sirtuins and cardiovascular diseases

Medical Xpress - Cardiology

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) refers to a group of disorders affecting the heart and blood vessels and is a leading cause of death globally. Lifestyle factors have been linked to the incidence of CVD and the inclusion of an active, healthy lifestyle along with other therapeutic interventions may help combat CVD.

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Managing DME Patients Unresponsive to Anti-VEGF

HCPLive

An expert retina specialist discusses challenges faced by DME patients showing suboptimal response to standard anti-VEGF treatment, emphasizing the need to reduce injection burden while preventing vision loss.

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Aortic Stenosis with Severely Elevated Gradients but Moderately Reduced Valve Area: What's the Prognosis?

NEJM Journal Watch - Cardiology

In a retrospective study, patients with markedly elevated aortic gradients had similarly poor prognosis regardless of whether estimated valve area was severely or moderately reduced.

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Managing Patients With High-Risk PDR and DME

HCPLive

Ehsan Rahimy, MD, outlines strategies for managing cases of high-risk PDR and DME, exploring new therapies and synergistic combinations with anti-VEGF and steroids for longer-lasting responses.

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MAGNETOM Cima.X 3T MR Scanner Cleared by FDA

Cassling

Industry’s strongest gradients on a clinically available 3T MR scanner Enables clinicians to see smaller structures and capture images faster New features address major obstacles for scientific community, can advance research Siemens Healthineers has announced the Food and Drug Administration clearance of the MAGNETOM Cima.X 3 Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging whole-body scanner.

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Guselkumab in Patients With Skin of Color: VISIBLE Trial Design

HCPLive

Dr Linda Stein Gold, Dr Mona Shahriari and Dr Seemal Desai discuss VISIBLE trial, a randomized clinical trial specifically designed to examine treatment outcomes with guselkumab in patients with skin of color.

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It's time to overcome the "One-Size-Fits-All" approach in chronic coronary syndrome?

The American Journal of Cardiology

Publication date: Available online 27 March 2024 Source: The American Journal of Cardiology Author(s): Giampaolo Niccoli, Filippo Luca Gurgoglione

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Managing a Treatment Experienced Patient with nAMD

HCPLive

Ehsan Rahimy, MD, discusses challenges in managing longstanding nAMD patients rotating through anti-VEGF treatments, highlighting the promise of newer therapies like aflibercept 8mg and faricimab.

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10 Things You Should Know About Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Stroke Journal

Stroke, Ahead of Print.

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T Cell Vaccine Demonstrates Safety as Functional Cure for Hepatitis B Virus in Phase 1 Trial

HCPLive

The first-in-human trial of VRON-0200, a novel immunotherapy for chronic hepatitis B virus, presented at the APSAL meeting, demonstrates a promising safety and tolerability profile.

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