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ECG Cases 49 – ECG and POCUS for Dyspnea and Chest Pain

ECG Cases

In this ECG Cases blog, Jesse McLaren and Rajiv Thavanathan explore how ECG and POCUS complement each other for patients presenting to the emergency department with shortness of breath or chest pain. The post ECG Cases 49 – ECG and POCUS for Dyspnea and Chest Pain appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

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Chest pain with serial ECGs – can you guess the sequence?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Jesse McLaren A 45-year-old presented with 24 hours of intermittent chest pain. On it’s own this is nonspecific, but in the right context this could be diagonal occlusion (if active chest pain) or infero-posterior reperfusion (if resolved chest pain). #2 Can you guess the sequence?

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Which patient has the more severe chest pain?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

2 middle aged males presented with chest pain. Which had the more severe chest pain at the time of the ECG? Patient 2 at the bottom with a very subtle OMI complained of 10/10 chest pain at the time the ECG was recorded. 414 patients were included in the analysis.

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Quiz post: two patients with chest pain. Do either, both, or neither have OMI?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Pendell Meyers Two patients with acute chest pain. Patient 1: Patient 2: Patient 1: A man in his 40s with minimal medical history presented with acute chest pain radiating to his R shoulder. Two patients with chest pain. Do either, neither, or both have OMI and need reperfusion?

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Chest pain: Are these really "Nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities", as the cardiologist interpretation states?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Jesse McLaren, with a very few edits by Smith A 60-year-old presented with chest pain. Inferior hyperacute T waves, which have been added to the 2022 ACC consensus on chest pain as a “STEMI equivalent”[3] 3. But are there any other signs of Occlusion MI? Conduction disorders in the setting of acute STEMI.

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ACC Chest Pain Pathway Validation

American College of Cardiology

What is the validity the American College of Cardiology Expert Consensus Decision Pathway (ACC Pathway) for chest pain in a multisite US cohort?

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A 50-something with chest pain.

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

This was sent by anonymous The patient is a 55-year-old male who presented to the emergency department after approximately 3 to 4 days of intermittent central boring chest pain initially responsive to nitroglycerin, but is now more constant and not responsive to nitroglycerin. It is unknown when this pain recurred and became constant.